A 32-ha estate of untenanted land, bordered by a stream, with an old manor
and its outbuildings awaiting restoration, on Mont-Saint-Michel Bay
Rennes, ILLE-ET-VILAINE brittany 35000 FR

Location

20 minutes from Mont-Saint-Michel, 40 minutes from Saint-Malo and 50 minutes from Rennes, Brittany’s capital, with 1½ hour TGV train links to Paris. 5 km from a market town with some 2,000 inhabitants, shops and amenities, markets selling local produce as well as primary and secondary schools. Near to the estate are numerous hiking and horse-riding trails. Delimited by the wooded copses on its hills, the surrounding rural area stands out courtesy of the two water courses that, basking in the sun, water this bocage countryside. This landscaped property can be observed from numerous points of view on the bordering slopes that give panoramic vistas, notably taking in Mont-Saint-Michel Bay which extends the basin.

Description

A country lane leads to this property. A first stone building stands at the entrance. A poplar-tree-lined driveway, some 130 m long, leads to the manor house. On either side of the latter, an old chapel and an old bakery stand facing a barn and a cowshed. A farm shed completes the outbuildings. A well. The vestige of an old moat, some 40 metres from the house, forms a lake stretching towards the chapel. It is said that this moat once surrounded the manor. The current building is constructed on the site of an old medieval manor house. All the buildings are in need of major restoration works. These buildings are surrounded by numerous plots of fields and meadows. The estate, bordered by a stream, extends over a little more than 30 continuous hectares.

The manor house

Spanning approx. 400 m² of living space, this manor house is composed of two adjoining, rectangular buildings, constructed from sandstone. The first building features five windows as well as a door on the main facade and five windows as well as two doors on the rear facade. The second is aligned with three bays of doors and windows. Granite has been used for the surrounds framing all the openings. An old tower, on the rear facade, and an opening fitted with a metal grid on a gable wall bear witness to the medieval building. The roofs, covered with natural slate and asbestos cement slate, are enhanced with moulded cornices. The manor house is topped with ten roof dormers, also adorned with wooden cornices. Inside, the buildings span three levels. The ground floor comprises three large, adjoining, through rooms. Illuminated via five windows, a first room has exposed ceiling beams, a fireplace and a wooden stairway. A passageway leads to a second room, with a fireplace. And lastly, the third room still has three outstanding features: a stone dresser, a wooden stairway with flat busters and a fireplace with an alcove for storing the ash. A support pillar is engraved with the year 1736. The first floor is taken up by three large, adjoining rooms, all with parquet flooring. A stairway goes up to the attic space, composed of three attics.

The old chapel

This chapel was constructed near to the manor house and the old moat. A square building, it is built of sandstone and topped with a hip, slate roof. Its facade features two openings and an alcove, all framed with dressed granite stone surrounds. The door lintel is straight, whilst an ogee lintel tops the window. The inside has packed mud floors and partially rendered walls as well as an outstanding roofing framework forming a vault. Part of the panelling lining the latter is still in existence.

The former bakery

Next to the old chapel, this former bakery is constructed from sandstone. Its facade features a door and four windows, framed with dressed granite stone surrounds. The inside of this building, spanning a ground surface area of approx. 55 m², comprises a ground floor, with a large room featuring a fireplace, topped with an upstairs. A temporary sheet metal roof keeps it weathertight.

The small house

This is the first building to come into sight at the entrance to the estate. Spanning a ground surface area of approx. 60 m², it is constructed from sandstone. It comprises two levels. The main facade features two windows and an outstanding arched doorway, framed with granite. The rear facade has a second door and two windows letting light into the inside.

The outbuildings

The roofs of these two buildings, used for farming purposes, are covered with asbestos cement slate. The barn, built from sandstone, has a wide passageway, with a door sliding on a rail. It is used for parking cars and storing equipment. The cowshed is also constructed from sandstone. Both buildings, topped with attics, adjoin one another and intercommunicate via a door.

The large farm shed

This modern construction, with a wooden framework topped with sheets of asbestos cement, spans a surface area of approx. 96 m². It stands near to the outbuildings and is used for storing equipment and harvests.

The land

Extending a little over 30 continuous hectares, this estate is composed of fields and meadows. A stream runs alongside the property boundary for approx. 500 m. The 7 ha of meadows located along this stream can easily be used for grazing animals. The 23 ha of arable land are rarely short of water due to the presence of springs. More than half of the property’s 2 km long perimeter has been planted with oak, sweet chestnut and cherry trees over the last five years by the current owners who chose to select these local species. Said choice makes it possible to maintain the existing fauna and flora on the estate in keeping with the surrounding biodiversity. Consequently, the thick hedges and the stream are home to a large number of small animals (insects, salamanders, hares), deer and wild boar are also often to be seen in the grounds. Numerous species of birds and birds of prey have taken up residence here. Two separate plots of fields, each spanning approx. 7,000 m², some 500 metres from the property, complete this estate. And lastly, the manor house and its outbuildings are surrounded by approx. 5,000 m² of parklands, delimited by a lake spanning a surface area of approx. 800 m². This vestige of the old moat is fed by several springs. Near to the manor house is a very beautiful, one-hundred-year-old pear tree. All the land is untenanted and available for purchase.

Our opinion

Over the centuries, the vocation of these premises and, with it, their appearance has been modified countless times. Here, the presence of an old tower, there, an opening fitted with a metal grid as well as the lake, vestige of the old moat, all bear witness to this. This old manorial property blends in with the land surrounding it. The plots of arable land, the thick hedges, the stream and its riverine vegetation, where passing animals take refuge, constitute the bases of a now rare biotope. At the beginning of the last century, this decor, formed by the buildings and the landscape, was used as the setting for the novel of a writer particularly attached to this part of Upper Brittany, between land and sea. Although now in need of major works, the tranquillity, the space and the size of these buildings would be ideal for a multitude of projects. These premises are open to a wide range of possibilities involving farming, horse-riding or even rural tourism projects. The geographic location can but encourage such ambitions.

673 400 €
Fees at the Vendor’s expense


See the fee rates

Reference 346472

Land registry surface area 32 ha 93 a 79 ca
Main building surface area 400 m2
Outbuilding surface area 450 m2

Consultant


Lucie Riaux +33 1 42 84 80 85

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NB: The above information is not only the result of our visit to the property; it is also based on information provided by the current owner. It is by no means comprehensive or strictly accurate especially where surface areas and construction dates are concerned. We cannot, therefore, be held liable for any misrepresentation.

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