A 12th century castle, remodelled in the 19th century, with 25 ha
in the heart of the Loir Valley countryside, north of Tours
Château-du-Loir, SARTHE pays-de-loire 72500 FR

Location

200 km from Paris; 50 km north of Tours and south of Le-Mans. Near to a motorway interchange, an aerodrome and two TGV train stations (45 minutes) with excellent links taking less than an hour to Paris, going direct to Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle in 1¾ hours and taking less than 3 hours to Lyon, 4½ hours to Marseille, 2½ hours to Lille-Europe train station for London and 1½ hours to Nantes. All the Loir Valley tourist attractions are nearby. Le-Mans and its old Plantagenet town. 40 km from Le-Mans’ 24-hour racing circuit, the Porsche-Experience-Centre driving school and the International Le-Mans-Karting go-cart track. 40 km from the Golf-du-Circuit, set in the middle of the circuit along the mythical Hunaudières straight. Less than 10 km from a little town with all amenities.

Description

This estate is in a wild, wooded setting, with a view over the surrounding countryside. It is reached via two driveways, one reserved for visitors and the other for tradespeople. The first is a long avenue, with woods and meadows on either side. It is barred halfway along by gates, flanked by tall pillars, and is dotted with old streetlamps, lighting the way to the entrance courtyard in front of the castle, with the keep looking on. It precedes the old chapel, the top section of which is now converted into a bedroom, followed by a house that could be used as a caretaker’s cottage and, lastly, the castle. Driveways lead from the entrance courtyard to the rear where there are carparks and meadows, delimited by hedges. A pathway gives access to the south-facing, swimming pool area, surrounded by safety fencing and partially enclosed by old walls. A driveway goes down on the west side to the outbuildings, comprising an annexe house and its small outbuildings, a 350 m² building, with an area given over to physical well-being on the ground floor, a barn and its workshop, a building housing five horse loose boxes and a tack room, and another building that could take cars, although it is currently fitted with six horse loose boxes. Meadows beyond the outbuildings could accommodate horses. Woods border the property.

The castle

This L-shaped castle is laid out over four levels, each spanning a surface area of 250 m². The facade, facing the entrance courtyard, features a central, hexagonal, entrance and stairway tower, two round, corner towers and turrets with corbelling. A central projection on the rear facade features three bays. They top the balcony that gives outside access to the large lounge. It is flanked by two square towers, to which are adjoined two round corner towers. Their neo-gothic decor, comprising imitation machicolation and battlements, is concentrated on the dormer pediments and the doors, the first being made of moulded stone and enhanced with coats-of-arms. The roofs, covered with slate, were all redone in the winter of 2020-2021.


Base level
The foundations of these premises date back to the 12th century. A lower, partially vaulted level which can be reached from the outside, comprises kitchens, storerooms, a fruitstore and a staff changing room. Cellars, a linen room and a boiler room complete this level. It also has a double-entry lift that goes up to the first floor.
Ground floor
The main stairway is installed in a vestibule. On one side is a toilet whilst, on the other, double doors open into the large reception lounge, equipped for use as a projection room. It provides access to four adjoining rooms, one of which is housed in one of the towers. A vast dining room is followed in one of the towers by a small lounge and a space for a toilet. A pantry and kitchens. A back stairway goes up to the attic space. Decorative features include marble or stone fireplaces, trumeaux, panelling and decorative staffs. Floors are laid with tiles or herringbone pattern parquet flooring. Ceilings feature moulding or cross-ribbed vaults.
First floor
This level is reached via the monumental stairway. A landing provides access to seven bedrooms, four bathrooms and separate toilets.
Second floor
The second floor is taken up by six bedrooms, two shower room and miscellaneous rooms.

The old chapel

This building has been modified and deconsecrated. The ground floor could be used as accommodation for a caretaker. The upstairs, under its vault, has been converted into a suite, with a bathroom.

The dovecote

This is the first building that visitors see as they arrive. Robust, it comprises 800 dove-holes, but has unfortunately lost its roof.

The large outbuilding dubbed “L’Auberge” (The Inn)

This rectangular building spans a surface area of 350 m² over two levels. The ground floor comprises an exercise room, a sauna and a shower. The remainder of the surface area is currently laid out as one room. The upstairs is taken up by a dormitory as well as bathroom and toilet facilities. The other outbuildings delimit the courtyard, located behind the inn. The roofs on all of the outbuildings are new, recently redone with slate.

The barn and the workshop

A rectangular, wooden building, it is topped with a slate roof. The open lower section is used as for storing hay. The workshop is closed.

The second house

This house, concealed behind a high wall, forms a courtyard with small outbuildings. Recently renovated, it comprises a living room with a kitchen, two bedrooms, a study and a bathroom. It would be possible to convert the attic space. It is bordered by a large, covered terrace.

The buildings in use as stables

One is laid out with a tack room and five loose boxes able to accommodate large ponies. The other, constructed from breezeblock, is big enough to take six horses or it could also be converted for vintage cars.

The exteriors

300 hectares of forest border these premises with open pathways. The landscape parklands, spanning approx. 5 hectares are composed of meadows, tree-lined pathways, strewn with bulbs, and copses. They are planted with various species of tall trees such as Lebanon cedar, sequoia, hornbeam, oak and many others. Their lower section is closed by a meadow. To the rear, in the midst of the property’s 25 hectares, is a swimming pool area, protected by old walls, as well as a carpark, partially concealed behind copses. The majority of the land is made up of grassland, with 1 hectare of woods.
The filtration system for the 6x10 m swimming pool was changed in 2020 and safety fencing was added. A 34-metre deep well is used for watering purposes.

Our opinion

The elegance of the buildings is worthy of note. These premises were once used as a children’s holiday camp and could accommodate visitors as all the required facilities are still operational. The current owners have undertaken major works to rehabilitate the surroundings, seeking to give this property back all of its splendour of yesteryear. The ground and first floors of the castle have also undergone a facelift and now feature modern-day reception rooms and bedrooms. Both the second floor and the 350 m² building abound in potential. The conversion of thirty bedrooms could be envisaged. These premises would be equally suited to a private project as to the development of a business activity.

1 799 000 €
Fees at the Vendor’s expense


See the fee rates

Reference 102770

Land registry surface area 25 ha 65 a 7 ca
Main building surface area 680 m2
Number of bedrooms 13
Outbuilding surface area 1000 m2
including refurbished area130 m2

French Energy Performance Diagnosis

Consultant
Sarthe


Catherine Boivin +33 1 42 84 80 85

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NB: The above information is not only the result of our visit to the property; it is also based on information provided by the current owner. It is by no means comprehensive or strictly accurate especially where surface areas and construction dates are concerned. We cannot, therefore, be held liable for any misrepresentation.

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